Solar Racing Newsletters

5Aug19Cover

Find out more about how our race went and hear from some of our team members about the performance of the car and the team.

5Aug19Cover

On the road to Darwin, certification and send off event. Plus finishing the dashboard and meet our drivers!

5Aug19Cover

Official launch of the MTAA Super Charge 2! Plus find out about our SciScouts display about the health of our drivers.

5Aug19Cover

ANU open day, reveal event and a bit about our steering system.

5Aug19Cover

The chassis of our solar car has arrived and the battery box is almost complete. As we are getting closer to the race we have a new sponsor and are participating in student events.

5Aug19Cover

Solar cell encapsulation is complete! This means our solar panels are now ready to attach onto our solar car.

July 29

Human power vs Solar Power - who will come out on top? Plus some updates on the car build and some of our social events.

22July

Bushweek, battery boxes, Tomato Trials and more. It has been a busy week for the MTAA Super Solar Racing.

15July

Find out more about how we design our solar car's suspension, as well us the dates of our upcoming events, and qualification for the upcoming race!

8July

The MTAA Super Sol Invictus colouring in competition has come to a close, as well us updates to the carbon fibre chassis, battery cells, and more!

In The News.

Check out some of the news and media coverage our team have received for our journey and achievements.

MTAA Super Solar Racing Team Launch Night

MTAA Super Solar Racing Team Launch Night

While wrapping up the busy month of May, MTAA Super Solar Racing hosted a Team Launch Night at the Australian Centre on China in the World. This event officially introduced the 2019 solar car team and recognised the friends and sponsors of MTAA Super Solar Racing. Both the technical and business team came together to mingle with guests and discuss the project. The 2017 race car and current 2019 car were displayed for everyone to admire and engage with.
Professor Michael Cardew-Hall (ANU Pro Vice Chancellor for Innovation), Leeanne Turner (CEO of MTAA Super) and Shane Rattenbury MLA (Minister for Climate Change and Sustainability) shared their involvement and thoughts on the Solar Racing project. These speakers emphasised the inspiring role the project plays in battling climate change and Canberra’s transition to 100% renewable energy. Avik Mason (Project Lead) also spoke about the team’s efforts and expectations for the upcoming race.
Thank you to our events team for organising this stellar event and all who attended to make it a successful night!

solar car chassis at event

All About Carbon Fibre...

All About Carbon Fibre...

Carbon fibre is one of the strongest and most lightweight materials on the market. It is five times stronger than steel and one third its weight. Around 5-10 micrometres in diameter, the fibre is made mostly of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal pattern. The pattern contains layers stacked on top of each other and sheets are crumpled together in an irregular fashion. The material can be thinner than a strand of human hair and forms a robust complex when twisted together like yarn. The woven product can be placed over a mould and coated in resin or plastic. The structure of carbon fibre gives the material high tensile strength, chemical resistance and temperature tolerance. These properties make it very popular and ideal for manufacturing race cars and solar vehicles. Carbon fibre is usually crafted from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), a thermoplastic that becomes flexible at high temperatures and hardens upon cooling. PAN strands are heated without oxygen to prevent burning. This causes atoms inside the fibres to vibrate aggressively, expelling the majority of the non-carbon atoms. The product is composed of long and tightly interlocking carbon chains. The fibres are then oxidised so the resin can stick to it.

Meet Our Mechanical Co-Lead:
Nick Hatala

Meet Our Mechanical Co-Lead: Nick Hatala

Nick is a fourth year Bachelor of Engineering student who was born and raised in Canberra. He is double majoring in mechanical and material systems and renewable energy systems, which complements his role at MTAA Super Solar Racing. He is a self-taught mechanic who enjoys working on his own car and has built his own 3D printer.
Nick joined the solar car project halfway through 2018, just as we entered the design phase. As one of our mechanical co-leads, he is leading mechanical engineers in the team towards a successful design for the solar car. This involves design manufacturing and reviewing.
The Solar Racing project has helped bring Nick’s passion for renewables to life and solidified his choice to become a mechanical engineer. The project has been a fun way for him to apply the skills he’s acquired throughout his degree.
Fun Fact: Nick used to be a part of Warehouse Circus and can juggle, unicycle and perform acrobatics!

Chassis

Chassis

The intricacies of carbon fibre frames- a day out.
April 2019

applying fibreglass

Carbon fibre is one of the strongest and most lightweight materials on the market. It is five times stronger than steel and one third its weight. Around 5-10 micrometres in diameter, the fibre is made mostly of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal pattern. The pattern contains layers stacked on top of each other and sheets are crumpled together in an irregular fashion. The material can be thinner than a strand of human hair and forms a robust complex when twisted together like yarn. The woven product can be placed over a mould and coated in resin or plastic. The structure of carbon fibre gives the material high tensile strength, chemical resistance and temperature tolerance. These properties make it very popular and ideal for manufacturing race cars and solar vehicles. Carbon fibre is usually crafted from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), a thermoplastic that becomes flexible at high temperatures and hardens upon cooling. PAN strands are heated without oxygen to prevent burning. This causes atoms inside the fibres to vibrate aggressively, expelling the majority of the non-carbon atoms. The product is composed of long and tightly interlocking carbon chains. The fibres are then oxidised so the resin can stick to it.

The SMART energy council of Australia

Talking Women in STEM at Hawker Colledge

MTAA Super Solar Racing team potent with 29 members

Diversity at MTAA Super Solar Racing

Solar Racing Team Design Phase Nearing Completion

MTAA Super Signs as Naming Sponsor

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Sol Invictus body shell